Day 22 – Parsing an IPv4 address

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Guest post by Herbert Breunung (lichtkind).

Perl 5 brought regexes to mainstream programming and set a standard, one that is felt as relevant even in Redmond. Perl 6, of course, steps up the game by adding many new features to the regex camp, including easy-to-build grammars for your own complex parsers. But without getting too complex, you can get a lot of joy out of Perl 6′s rx (that’s how Perl 6 spells Perl 5′s qr operator, that enables you to save a Regex in a variable).

Because the Perl 6 regex syntax is less littered with exceptional cases, Larry Wall also likes to joke that he put the “regular” back into “regular expression”.

Some of the changes are:

  • most special variables are gone,
  • non-capturing groups and other grouping syntax is easier to type,
  • no more single/multi line modes,
  • x mode became default, making whitespace non-significant by default.

In summary, regexes are more regular than in Perl 5, confirming Larry’s joke. They try a bit harder to make your life easier when you need to match text. Under the hood, regexes have blossomed out into a complete sub-language within the bigger Perl 6 language. A language with its own parsing rules.

But don’t fret; not everything has changed. Some things remain the same:

/\d+/

This regex still matches one or more consecutive digits.

Similarly, if you want to capture the digits, you can do this, just like you’re used to:

/(\d+)/

You’ll find the matched digits in $0, not $1 as in Perl 5. All the special variables $0, $1, $2 are really syntactic sugar for indexing the match variable ($/[0], $/[1], $/[2]). Because indices start at 0, it makes sense for the first matched group to be $0. In Perl 5, $0 contains the name of the script or program, but this has been renamed into $*EXECUTABLE_NAME in Perl 6.

Should you be interested in getting all of the captured groups of a regex match, you can use @(), which is syntactic sugar for @($/).

The object in the $/ variable holds lots of useful information about the last match. For example, $/.from will give you the starting string position of the match.

But $0 will get us far enough for this post. We use it to extract individual features from a string.

Sometimes we want to extract a whole bunch of similar things at once. Then we can use the :g (or :global) modifier on the regex:

$_ = '1 23 456 78.9';
say .Str for m:g/(\d+)/; # 1 23 456 78 9

Note that the :g — as opposed to prior regex implementations — sits up front, right at the start of the regex. Not at the end. That way, when you read the regex from left to right, you will know from the start how the regex is doing its matching. No more end-heavy regex expressions.

Matching “all things that look like this” is so useful, that there’s even a dedicated method for that, .comb:

$str.comb(/\d+/);

If you’re familiar with .split, you can think of .comb as its cheerful cousin, matching all the things that .split discards.

Let’s tackle the matching of an IPv4 address. Coming from a Perl 5 angle, we expect to have to do something like this:

/(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})/

This won’t do in Perl 6, though. First of all, the {} blocks are real blocks in a Perl 6 regex; they contain Perl 6 code. Second, because Perl 6 has lots of error handling to catch p5isms, like this, you’ll get an error saying “Unsupported use of {N,M} as general quantifier; in Perl 6 please use ** N..M (or ** N..*)”.

So let’s do that. To match between one and three digits in a Perl 6 regex, we should type:

/\d ** 1..3/

Note how the regex sublanguage re-uses parts from the main Perl 6 language. ** can be seen as a kind of exponentiation (if we squint), in that we’re taking \d “to the between-first-and-third power”. And the range notation 1..3 exists both outside and within regexes.

Using our new knowledge about the repetition quantifier, we end up with something like this:

/(\d**1..3) \. (\d**1..3) \. (\d**1..3) \. (\d**1..3)/

That’s still kinda clunky. We might end up wishing that we could use the repetition operator again, but those literal dots in between prevent us from doing that. If only we could specify repetition a given number of times and a divider.

In Perl 6 regexes, you can.

/ (\d ** 1..3) ** 4 % '.' /

The % operator here is a quantifier modifier, so it can only follow on a quantifier like * or + or **. The choice of % for this function is relatively new in Perl 6, and you may prefer to read it as “modulo”, just like in the main language. That is, “match four groups of digits, modulo literal dots in between”. Or you could think of the dots in between as the “remainder”, the separators that are left after you’ve parsed the actual elements.

Oh, and you might’ve noticed that \. changed to '.' on the way. We can use either; they mean exactly the same. In Perl 5, there isn’t a simple rule saying which symbols have a magic meaning and which ones simply signify themselves. In Perl 6, it’s easy: word characters (alphanumerics and the underscore) always signify themselves. Everything else has to be escaped or quoted to get its literal meaning.

Putting it all together, here’s how we would extract IPv4 addresses out of a string:

$_ = "Go 127.0.0.1, I said! He went to 173.194.32.32.";

say .Str for m:g/ (\d ** 1..3) ** 4 % '.' /;
# output: 127.0.0.1 173.194.32.32

Or, we could use .comb:

$_ = "Go 127.0.0.1, I said! He went to 173.194.32.32.";
my @ip4addrs = .comb(/ (\d ** 1..3) ** 4 % '.' /);

If we’re interested in individual integers, we can get those too:

$_ = "Go 127.0.0.1, I said! He went to 173.194.32.32.";
say .list>>.Str.perl for m:g/ (\d ** 1..3) ** 4 % '.' /;
# output: ("127", "0", "0", "1") ("173", "194", "32", "32")

If you want to know more, read the S05, or watch me battling with my slide deck and the English language in this presentation about regexes.

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2 Responses to “Day 22 – Parsing an IPv4 address”

  1. bbkr Says:

    IP 127.666.0.1 is not valid. If you want to be more strict you can use syntax to check if captured number is in required range:

    ‘$_ = “Go 127.666.0.1, I said! He went to 173.194.32.32.”;
    say .Str for m:g/ ( (\d ** 1..3) <?{ 0 < $0 ) ** 4 % “.” /;’
    173.194.32.32

  2. bbkr Says:

    Above comment is broken due to WP treating Perl code as HTML.

    Correct syntax:
    https://gist.github.com/4362742

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